Proposed ​Haisla Nation floating LNG project starts environmental review

Image: Cedar LNG

A proposed floating LNG terminal at Kitimat, B.C. has initiated its environmental review, targeting operations in 2025.

The Impact Assessment Agency of Canada is inviting public comment on the project after receiving formal initial documents from its proponent, the Haisla Nation.

In May 2016, Haisla-owned company Cedar LNG was issued a 25-year LNG export license by the National Energy Board, with the possibility of extension to 40 years.

Project description documents filed last week with the Impact Assessment Agency propose Cedar LNG will process and liquefy approximately 400 million to 500 million cubic feet per day of natural gas into approximately 3 million to 4 million tonnes per annum of LNG.

Cedar told the agency that LNG demand growth in Asia and Europe is expected to increase as countries pursue alternatives to diesel and coal to support cleaner electricity generation, heating, and transportation requirements.

Its project will “contribute to economic reconciliation in British Columbia by recognizing and implementing Haisla Nation’s authority over economic development on Haisla Nation-owned lands,” the company said.

“Income generated by the project will be invested by Cedar in the Haisla community and will provide jobs and contracting opportunities for Haisla Nation members, members of other local Indigenous groups, and local community members.”

The Impact Assessment Agency is accepting public comment about the proposed project until October 20, 2019.

Up for consideration is a request from the Government of British Columbia that it conduct the environmental impact assessment for Cedar LNG in substitution for the federal government, if that measure is determined to be required.

Project construction is planned to start in 2022, followed by operations in 2025.

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