​LNG Canada, JGC Fluor launch trades training program for women

(L-R): Peter Zebedee, incoming CEO, LNG Canada; Phil Clark, project director for JGC Fluor; Tracey MacKinnon, workforce development manager, LNG Canada; Michelle Mungall, Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources; Crystal Smith, Chief Councilor, Haisla Nation; Andy Calitz, CEO of LNG Canada. Image: CNW Group/LNG Canada

LNG Canada and its main contractor, JGC Fluor, are launching a new four-week work-readiness program aimed at getting more women into the skilled trades.

The program, dubbed Your Place, is intended to attract, recruit and retain more women in construction trades.

“Women in British Columbia currently represent just under 5% of a typical construction workforce, despite comprising 50% of the working population,” Andy Calitz, CEO of LNG Canada, said in a press release.

“This lack of diversity is not a women’s issue, it is a workplace issue. We are missing out on a talented demographic who will enter careers in the skilled construction trades and help British Columbia prosper. We want women to know there is a place for them on our project.”

For women graduating from trades training programs, JGC Fluor will provide entry level opportunities for graduate trainees on the $40 billion LNG Canada project. At peak construction, the project will employ up to 7,500 workers.

Women who already have trades skills are also encouraged to apply for jobs on the project.

“By providing training opportunities and employment support, Your Place will help remove barriers for women who want to enter the skilled trades and pursue a career in B.C.’s energy sector,” said Michelle Mungall, Minister of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources.

The four-week training program is open to all women 18 and older. Training will be provided in Kitimat.

For those women who sign up for the program, the company will cover the cost of return flights and accommodation during the four-week program.

— Business in Vancouver

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