​Deal reached in northern British Columbia pipeline impasse

Image: Greenpeace/Twitter

SMITHERS, B.C. — Hereditary chiefs of the Wetsuweten First Nation say they've reached a deal with RCMP to allow builders of the Coastal GasLink pipeline access across a bridge that had been blocked in their territory.

The agreement was reached on Thursday at the Office of the Wet'suwet'en, a day after the chiefs announced a tentative deal would see members of the First Nation observe a court injunction by allowing workers and contractors access to a work site for the pipeline, which will feed the $40 billion LNG Canada export project.

The chiefs said the meeting was expected to discuss a Unist'ot'en healing camp, which they wanted left undisturbed.

They also wanted to discuss whether the camp could retain a gate at the site, which residents say is vital to their safety.

The RCMP arrested 14 people on Monday when they enforced the injunction.

They also dismantled a nearby checkpoint erected by members of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation, who say the company does not have authority to work on their territory without consent from the nation's hereditary clan chiefs.

© 2019 The Canadian Press

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